Info For Parents

Have a Question?

How Can My Child Benefit From Scouting?

Over 31,000,000 young people worldwide can't be wrong...

In an independent survey of over 2,000 parents of Scouts, nine out of ten parents said Scouting is worthwhile and nine in ten said their children find Scouting enjoyable. As your child progresses through Scouts you should be able to see signs of the impact their Scouting adventure has on them. Parents tell us Scouting gives their children more confidence, responsibility and a broader set of friends. Scouting can help develop your child’s social skills and encourage self-sufficiency, and gives them access to activities and opportunities that may have been otherwise unavailable to them. A huge number of parents agreed that since their child joined Scouting family life was easier and they were ‘nicer children to live with’.

This is a great read about what to expect for your child from Scouting

My child has a disability or additional need; can they join Scouts?

The Scout Association is committed to being inclusive of all young people, regardless of ability or disability and has a clear Equal Opportunities Policy. There is flexibility within Scouting and all our groups will make reasonable adjustments wherever possible to support the inclusion of young people with disabilities or additional needs.

The best way forwards would be to contact us and talk it through.

Is Scouts a religious organisation?

The Scout Association is an inclusive and values-based Movement. Membership is open to young people and adults of all faiths and beliefs, including the absence of an affirmed faith, humanists or atheists, who share our values. Our values are integrity, respect, care, belief and cooperation. A key element of the programme is spiritual development and exploring different faiths, beliefs and attitudes. There are a range of variations of the Promise (a commitment made by all members), to account for different age ranges, faith and beliefs and nationalities (including those who are stateless).

I don’t feel I have any suitable skills; how can I get involved?

Parents can volunteer and help in many ways; you don’t have to be a regular Bear Grylls. You might have first aid knowledge that you could teach the group, or you might be able to teach our Scouts a thing or two about DIY.

If you’re good with accounts you could be Group treasurer, or if you’re a culinary whizz you could run cooking sessions with the young people. Everyone has a skill (whether you know it or not) and we can make use of it.

There's no pressure to continue as a helper or leader afterwards, but hopefully we'll be able to inspire you by showing how easy and rewarding it can be to volunteer with Scouts.